May 15, 2011

Questions, Questions


Title: Questions, Questions
Marcus Pfister 
(Author and Illustrator)
(Click this link to order from Amazon: Questions, Questions)



Comprehension Strategy: Questioning                        
Art Modality: Visual Art

Summary:
Pfister's latest book is a sweetly simple look at some very deep questions, allowing children the opportunity to delve into some of life's mysteries. ...In a world that so often emphasizes answers and solid facts, it is refreshing to see a text that encourages questioning, whether realistic or imaginative
flights of fancy. (Summary from Kirkus Reviews.)

Materials:
Questions, Questions
art paper or construction paper
pencils
cardboard (thick enough to hold a cutout shape, but not too thick for young children to cut)
acrylic paints in a variety of colors and silver
paintbrushes

Lesson:
Is there any question what this teaching idea is all about? What is the focus comprehension strategy? Questioning, course! What art modality? Visual art, it’s plain to see! You’ll want to begin by just reading this simply beautiful book aloud. After reading, you might want to let students partner-talk about answers to some of the questions. Or you might give students a chance to journal their answers to their favorite questions. And without a doubt, you’ll want to give students time to brainstorm and ask their own questions. Students will also enjoy finding the silver design on each page. Follow-up your class discussions and writing with this visual-art activity.

Mr. Pfister says, “The illustrations have been realized with a new technique. First I transferred each part of a picture onto a cardboard and then cut them out. Afterwards I colored the cutout pieces of cardboard with acrylics and stamped them onto aquarelle paper. Try this technique once with your kids! You will get very nice results...”
First have each student record a question to illustrate. Students may be invited to choose a question from the book, or ask their own questions. Each child draws the outline of a simple shape, “coloring-book style,” onto a piece of cardboard. He then cuts out the shape. Next he paints one side of the shape. Finally, he flips the painted shape over and presses it gently onto the paper. Slowly peeling the shape away from the paper will reveal the design. Students may then paint something near the design. Display the students’ questions along with their artwork. One question you’re sure to hear from colleagues... “Can I do that with my class, too?”
Here are some examples of my students’ questions and art:














So you have more questions about the author and illustrator Marcus Pfister? Visit his web site:













1 comment:

  1. Hi Pedgoddess!
    Love the art technique used!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete

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