February 22, 2012

When Sophie Gets Angry—Really, Really Angry



Title:
When Sophie Gets Angry—Really, Really Angry...
Molly Bang (Author & Illustrator)

Comprehension Strategies: 
Inferring, Making Connections 
             
Art Modalities: 
Drama, Visual Art

Summary:
It is often difficult for kids to talk about their feelings, especially anger. Bang offers a great opportunity for parents and kids to discuss anger and how Sophie handles it. The situation is typical; Sophie's sister has taken her toy, which makes her very angry. The vivid colors and illustrations likening Sophie to a volcano get the point across. So too does the resolution that Sophie finds, by escaping outdoors to climb her favorite tree. There she calms down and the world becomes a quieter place bathed in soothing green and blue. (Review from Children’s Literature.)

Materials:
When Sophie Gets Angry—Really, Really Angry...
paints and paper

Lesson:
Let’s face it...we all get angry. Sometimes we even get really, really angry. Chances are you’ll know when the time is right to share this book with your class. There are just those days when you and your students are tired and grumpy. Begin by showing your group only the cover. Infer...How is the girl feeling and how do you know? Invite students to make a similar face. Next have students take a closer look at the first spread. How is Sophie feeling now? How can you tell? Uh-oh. Now how is Sophie feeling? Can you use your experience with the picture clues to infer Sophie’s feelings? Show the next spread. Oh, my. Have students closely examine Sophie’s face and the cat. Even the zig-zag lines are a clue. At this point, you might want to remind your readers that inferring means combining your background knowledge and the clues in the book to infer a character’s feelings. Remind them that their own experiences count as background knowledge. Provide time for students to share similar experiences and feelings they may have had in the past.
Read the story aloud. Discuss the ways that Sophie handles her anger. Which are appropriate and which are inappropriate? Be sure to validate a variety of opinions. Finally, invite students to act out the story as you reread. Now doesn’t that feel better?




For younger students...

What Would Sophie Do?
(sung to the tune of “If You’re Happy and You Know It”)

If you’re angry and you know it, kick and scream.
If you’re angry and you know it, kick and scream.
If you’re angry and you know it,
Smash the world to smithereens.
If you’re angry and you know it, kick and scream.

If you’re angry and you know it, give a roar.
If you’re angry and you know it, give a roar.
If you’re angry and you know it,
Roar “red” more and more.
If you’re angry and you know it, give a roar.

If you’re angry and you know it, run and run.
If you’re angry and you know it, run and run.
If you’re angry and you know it,
Don’t stop until you’re done.
If you’re angry and you know it, run and run.

If you’re angry and you know it, cry and cry.
If you’re angry and you know it, cry and cry.
If you’re angry and you know it,
Find a tree and start to climb.
If you’re angry and you know it, cry and cry.

If you’re calm and you know it, climb back down.
If you’re calm and you know it, climb back down.
If you’re calm and you know it,
Climb back down and walk back home.
If you’re calm and you know it, climb back down.

Art Extension...
On her website, Molly Bang expresses her own feelings about creating the illustrations for the book:

“I made the pictures of gouache, which is a thick, mud-like paint and which feels nice and gucky when painted thickly. It is very satisfying to paint exuberant feelings with gouache. I began the book with bright pinks and purples and chartreuse, turning to reds and oranges when Sophie gets angry, then turning to browns, then blues and greens as she calms down, and then using the full palette when she returns home, "whole" again. It was interesting to notice how angry I felt while I was making the angry pictures, and how much calmer I felt when I was painting with the blues and greens.”
Already heading for the paints? Consider using fingerpaints. Even older kids will enjoy the experience. Another option is the dimensional paint recipe found here: http://familycrafts.about.com/od/paintrecipes/a/dimenpaint.htm


Teachers of older students, Let me express my feelings...CHECK OUT THIS LINK! You’ll find a picture book writing lesson from WritingFix. The lesson focuses on idea development and voice using Molly Bang’s book as the mentor text. There are templates and student samples. More feelings...I ESPECIALLY LOVED the interactive pre-writing buttons.

To read more about Molly Bang’s feelings about the book.

8 comments:

  1. We have loved this book for years in our house. Great review!

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's a great book! And I love the song. Thanks for sharing, Jayne.

    Barbara
    Grade ONEderful

    ReplyDelete
  3. I find your blog very interesting as I am always trying to integrate math and literature. I am now a blog follower because I need to be up-to-date on the latest primary books. When you have time, come on over and vist my blog as well.

    http://gofigurewithscipi.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm on my way over to your blog! Thanks for your comment. :) JG

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your blog is such a wonderful resource. My district has comprehension strategies as part of our balanced literacy/integrated curriculum. I love how your blog shows ways to incorporate art too. Your blog is a gem and a blessing. I cannot wait to share it with others and our Balanced Literacy Curriculum Specialist.

    I use this book to because it goes along with what I am teaching the children with Conscious Discipline.

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.

    I would love for you to visit my blog when you get the chance. =)


    Heather
    Heather's Heart

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you, thank you sweet Heather! Your kind words remind me to stay on task. Sometimes I'm just a blog "taker"...I've got to make more time to be a blog "giver" and keep posting. :)
    Also, I'm curious about the CD approach...I'll be looking up more about that.
    Your personality comes through in your great blog and I'm your newest follower. Thanks Booger Monkey!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I just found your blog through Pinterest and I'm your newest follower! What a wealth of fabulous ideas and resources!

    Mrs. Krull
    Of Primary Importance

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you like the ideas. I hope your kids like them, too. I've followed you back on your blog! Smiles, JG

      Delete

Please leave a comment...